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Nature's power makes clear the need for business continuity

Blog post   •   Jul 19, 2017 16:53 BST

There’s no point in saying “it will never happen to me” as disruptions are always just around the corner, regardless of what sector or location you are in. This reality was brought home to us overnight as thunderstorms with strong winds and heavy rain swept across the south of England. The problem was exacerbated by dry weather in recent months leaving the ground hard, so rain water could not easily soak away, resulting in flash floods.

The aftermath was plain to see this morning – standing water, trees down and debris brought by the flooding scattered everywhere. Last night there were reports of the urgent need for sandbags as water levels rose, and several local restaurants had to be evacuated as the water eventually did enter the building.

Of course there’s no reason to worry and BCI Central Office is in not in any danger of flooding. But it is a reminder that we, the BCI, along with every other organization, need to have a business continuity plan to deal with such events. What would have happened if flood water had entered the building, what would have happened if staff could not get to work because of travel disruptions, what would have happened if power had been cut off due to the storms? All these things need to be considered in advance if we are to remain a functional organization despite whatever disruption comes our way.

Thankfully we do have a business continuity programme in place, so should the worst happen then we will be prepared for it. For well over a year we have had a team made up of CBCIs and DBCIs working in Central Office, led by one of our Fellows and championed by a member of the Board.

The team have been working hard to ensure that threats and consequences are analysed, priority activities are declared, and processes are in place to make sure those priority activities can continue in the event of a disruption. To date it has worked, but we would never rest on our laurels and become complacent, rather we ensure it is an evolving process that continues to develop based on changes at Central Office, the result of actual disruptions, or the outcome of exercises.

This programme will be developed further as we are now recruiting for a dedicated business continuity professional to take it forward.

Business continuity is clearly important to our members, so it is vital that we practice what we preach and have a business continuity programme to be proud of, and we like to think we have achieved this.

David Thorp
Executive Director of the Business Continuity Institute.

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